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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
. but billions in subidies for wind energy should be expiring. could they be right or will they blow up energy prices. we'll go in focus with steve bor bes and bill and morgan. is it paying off? >> no, it is 18 times that of nuclear energy. ronald reagan was right. thest thing to immortality is a government program. politicians are labeled with hot wind and we label the section gone with the wind. >> we have sending sib sidies in '92, has it been worth it. >> we are early inlet process. we have subsidized oil and coal and gas. we have done them from darn near a century. these don't look so bad. like it or not, the majority of americans believe that global warming is an issue. we need to develop clear energy sources. fossil fuels may be a difficult problem. we are subsidizing thingings. it is cheaper to produce energy from natural gas. it is a subsidies. other than it is natural gas there. it is 63 cents compared to $53. that is not a pay off to me. >> i will have to disagree with rick. last time wind energy had any impact was in the century. we have moved in oil and natural gas. but let's get
and here in the city and those are really important to get the large scale renewable energy generation and additionally we might be able to use the program to efficient these programs and similar programs and it could be an important piece of getting to that 100% goal. >> in terms of the renewable energy study what's the next step. >> so we presented this to the mayor last week and he is very interested in moving forward and particular on some of the legislative pieces, and starting to -- for example, the example of pace into the federal legislative agenda and looking at supporting whether it's community or other pieces at the state level so we're talking about that as that legislative agenda comes up. we have the task force there. they're happy to continue their work. they really enjoyed being part of this work and so close in step with the city so they are available and willing to move forward. we at the department are moving forward on a number of these recommendations which are in the full task force and our u.s. department of energy grant and looking at permitting a
a european energy law, saying it causes confusion and undermined trust. russia is the biggest exporter of energy to europe. >> putin was speaking in brussels, where he has been holding talks with eu leaders. his first visit after he was reelected. although russia and the you are close trading partners, there are various contentious issues which divide them. >> vladimir putin did not waste any time on arrival -- just a quick way that the cameras. outside, protesters clashed with police. the women's rights activists were not mincing words, telling the president to go to help -- go to hell. inside, the eu message to russia was also clear. >> we will discuss commitments to guarantee our citizens democratic rights. >> the biggest disagreement is over energy issues. the eu has been critical of new gas pipelines from russia. the south stream pipeline is meant to carry russian gas through bulgaria to austria and italy, but the u.s. and russia are arguing over the rules to be applied to the new pipeline. >> it is true that some difference remained regarding some aspects of energy relations betw
on a number of these recommendations which are in the full task force and our u.s. department of energy grant and looking at permitting and financing in particular and we have a grant from the frank foundation to continue implementation and planning around some of the recommendations so we have the recommendations for the task force and we're looking to bring it in house and look at measures that are implementable in the future and low cost and move forward quickly and identify funding for. >> does this study have to be adopted by anyone? >> it doesn't have to be. if the board of supervisors wanted to we're of course open to that, but from my perspective it's a great tool for us to look at in guidance how we move forward with the energy policy and planning and with the electricity plan that we have from the sf puc that has been adopted by resolution i believe and it's a support document moving forward and provides background on the energy sector so it's a nice document to go back to for fact checking and data. >> i appreciate the thoroughness of the report. i do think it would be helpful to
energy is going to involve lots of investment, lots of jobs, lots of growth. what kind of growth? and in the long term there may be this question of. >> caller: an economy, can capitalism grow infin nightly? more immediately we have this subset of that question which is can we keep burning fossil fuels and the answer is no. >> and there's a nonenvironmental aspect to this. >> yeah. there are a lot of things that are wrong with gross domestic product. bobby kennedy talked about it in 1968 in which i keep going back and finding these kennedy quotes. it says, if we judge the united states of america by that, it counts air pollution and cigarette advertising and ambulances to clear away our highways of carnage yet the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of education or joy of their play. in short, it measures everything except that which makes life worthwhile. it can tell us everything about america except why we are proud that we are americans. >> great quote from bobby kennedy. we're going to keep talking about growth, its limits, and h
. i think what we should do is change the 100% 2020 goal to locally produced energy from facilities beyond that date. >> thank you. next speaker please. >> hello commissioners. my name is paul congressmanus and part of. >> >> bon hundred% solar. there is a way to get to one heard% -- 100% and ignored in this country by the media so you might not have heard of it. it's a solar payment policy. it requires pg&e to pay 54 cents kilowatt hour to homeowners that put panels on their roo. i know a hundred people in this town that are generating surplus and pg&e is basically stealing this surplus energy at the rate pg&e is paying, so it's simply a policy that the mayor can institute under executive powers, and get around pg&e that way. in germany it's created 400,000 new jobs. it's created $4 billion in cash flow through the economy and making the german economy the strongest in europe and it's the -- it basically is a policy that pays the homeowners so it makes investing in solar attractive to homeowners. right now it's not attractive to put a hundred solar panels on your roof, but
the energy airforce base. during the reagan administration, a great big commission that sounfound a soln for social security, these were big public fora where discussions were held with the public and now everything seems to be happening behind closed doors. why could openness happened in years past and today we can seem to get to deal? >> in large measure because the media has so changed. in those days, you did not have 24-hour coverage. what you find with 24-hour coverage if an idea services, at 10:00 a.m., it is dead by 2:00 p.m. because everybody goes to the cameras. the cameras are there. ever-present and wine to -- wanting to hype something. before you debate it is dead. you really see that around here. >> there has been a fair bit of criticism of the president for not embracing the findings of that commission. what is your take? >> i advised the president not to embrace the specifics because i feared if he did, house republicans would automatically be in opposition. if you are part of the commission you saw that dynamic. there were 18 of us. six representing the president, six rep
. back to you, carl. >> seema, thanks so much. check out some energy in metals this morning. let's go to our favorite birthday girl of the day. bertha coombs. >> thank you very much, for the birthday wishes. you know, it's national chocolate day. what else would be better on your birthday? except for a lot of inventory numbers today, delayed because of the christmas holiday. we have energy at the moment fractionally higher across the board. the dollar index weakening just a hair at the moment. despite the fact that we had industry numbers that were a bit bearish. the api putting out numbers of crude stocks. when you look out at the estimates for the eia, we're expecting to see a drawdown of crude of 2 million barrels. crude, the third weekly gain. one of the biggest gains we've seen in a long time, nearly 3% this week. it's looking fairly technically strong. gasoline will be the one that people will watch. eia estimates are for a build there of 250,000 barrels. it's closer to that than what we saw from the api at 2.5 million barrels. that's certainly going to be more bullish for gasol
on the energy markets. let's go to bertha coombs at the nymex. >> we are seeing a little bit of a pullback here when it comes to brent futures, and also across the board pretty much in energy today. not what you would necessarily expect with the weaker dollar. the concern, of course, is that if we do go over that fiscal cliff, no deal by the end of the year. that we will see some recessionary pressures here in the first quarter. at least that's what the congressional budget office is talking about. nat gas is feeling the pressure after a strong rally over the last couple of days. we're getting profit taking there. ironically, it comes after the commitment of traders report from the cftc saying we saw the biggest increase in terms of net long positions in nymex futures. gold holding steady. not necessarily being the big safe haven play. but it is among the strongest performers in the metals complex. we are seeing some strength in po laid yum and platinum. that according to rbc because of a new etf there. >> thank you very much, bertha coombs. we've got a travel doubleheader for you. former conti
, and that really release energy and restored some confidence also for the bureau. in 2013, people see more share market. the dax could reach a new record highs. people do expect it to be a bumpy road again. the growth percentage-wise probably not quite as big as it was this year. >> let's take a look at the numbers now on the last day of trading in frankfurt. the dax ended the day just over 0.5% down. euro stoxx 50 lost more ground than that. as for the dow over in new york, it is down 0.6%. the euro shedding just a little bit of ground against the dollar. >> in other news now, the united states says it deeply regrets the passage of a new law in russia that bars american citizens from adopting russian children. president vladimir putin has signed the law, which places new strains on bilateral relations. >> the new law comes in response to american legislation that withholds visas to russians accused of human rights violations and freezes their u.s. assets. >> most bills signed by president putin have not been subjected to so much public scrutiny, but the ban on americans adopting russian childre
. that was a near miss. something about labor disnews is the port. >> we try to move more energy outside of the u.s. to asia in particular, getting those contracts in place will be more important. but that is a ten year timeframe. >>> not-so-good news for nokia, a month after the launching in the u.s., cell phones are offered at steep discounts or free on u.s. carriers or amazon. nokia is betting heavily on that phone which runs microsoft's windows 8 system. it launched in november with at&t for $99. another version of the phone also available force 99 at verizon. some discussion, dennis, this is just how things work. >> i don't think that's how things work. if you buy an iphone 4s. this is not the most current model, iphone 4s, had verizon, tough pay $99. that is the outdated model. i encourage -- i don't know if people can tweet to the show, i would love to see photos of people actually using the nokia lumia. >> even for free, you mean? >> free or charged. >> would they use it for free? >> don't believe it is being used. >> on the subway, i count who's doing what. i've seen -- >> being very par
did not always get it from women. find it in other places, all that helps. that is the kind of energy that was given to me. "i'm going to take a risk. i may not be perfect at it." >> do you work all the time? >> i am a morning person. >> i could be on the west coast and i am not at 5:00 a.m. and people on the west coast would say i'm crazy. i will lose the thought so why do it. i am an early riser. that was something that was instilled in us. >> is 5:00 a.m. kind of typical? >> yes. >> how late did you work? >> i tried to get in at a decent hour. as a pastime, people do not think that we do this but i like to cook. i try to eat healthy. i will do cooking of vegetables and light entrees. something i enjoy is making home cooked pinto beans. when you brought in a household where that is pretty much all you need, but now it is like a luxury. it is what you put in, the kinds of spices. it is healthy for you. >> you ran the labor department. what is the biggest work ethic for women today? >> breaking through the glass ceiling. we have about 57% of diversity in my kitchen cabinet at the dol.
.s. becoming energy independent on its own. do you really think it will happen? because i still talk to a couple of people in the oim and gas industry that say, you know what? it's a far cry from the reality out there. we're still going to see the middle east being the dominating oil exporter. >>. >> i think in terms of any oil forecast, my experience is i'm lucky if i can forecast the oil price more than six months. so to forecast it eight years out, what's happened also is in terms of supply is that last year another reason why the oil price got held up was that we had problems in the north sea. the only nonopec user who came up with the goods was the u.s. everybody else failed as they always do. >> i was just wondering, christian, what your thoughts are. also, we were looking at the higher oil prices. higher being anything north of 100 at the time saying it's going to slow down a recovery in markets. this time around, now we're using to prices being in the region of 100. but what are your thoughts when you look at oil at the moment? >> well, we've had these two years where in wint
? by the barrelful? the carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> it was sunday afternoon, almost two full days since quinn was abducted and after a terrible morning when the money drop at the crab shack restaurant turned so disastrous. a text message, apparently from quinn, was sent to her mom's cell phone around 2:00 p.m. ♪ ♪ >> mom, please, no cops. i am so sorry about all of this, but they are pisseb, and i want to see my girls. the fbi hostage negotiator was toni cavity. >> you think about the kids in a situation like this? >> absolutely. we had made arrangements for them to stay elsewhere so they would be preserved from this. we are preserving life. >> doub you believe quinn isn't alive anymore? >> we don't know. >> investigators are becoming increasingly worried that they hadn't heard quinn's voice since the day before and then at about 5:25 that evening another text message came in to quinn's mom's phone. >> i do not get access to my phone. have reid ch
clothes better than hers, and i saw those clothes with energy. and i get less? this is unfair. unassetable there's a difference in minimum wage and not a difference in the skills of youth. the minimum wage is 21 years and older went up by 11p but for 16 to 18 it stayed the same. is this snare this is up acceptable. this is a campaign, there needs to be a change. thank you. [applause] >> who have we got from the northwest? the northwest. massive troop of people from the northwest. have you all not spoken before? okay. what about the guy at the end? yes. right at the end with the gray suit. >> i'm daniel and i'm from the northwest. minimum wage isn't the be all end all of wages. [inaudible] young people we don't have much experience, massive unemployed people from all ages. they've got more advantage than us. we have to pay -- [inaudible] >> we have to can useoo that to our advantage. thank you. >> okay. the young woman in the corner of the chamber. with flowers in her hair, leapt to her feet and has been striving regularly to contribute. now you can be heard. >> i'm from the southwest of en
if it is to prosper. it needs the energies of the creative imagination, as expressed in religion and the arts. it is crucial to the lives of all of our citizens, as it is to all human beings at all times, that they encounter a world that possesses a transcendent medium. the world in which the human experience makes sense. nothing is more dehumanizing, more certain to generate a crisis, then to experience one's life as a meaningless event in a meaningless world. we may be approaching what is unexplored and parallels social territory. -- perilous social territory. europe is experiencing the widespread waning of the religious impulse. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory, and ask, with peggy lee, is that all there is? when people decide that the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no transcendent meaning, when they conclude that life should be filled to overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to as which -- assuage the boredom. they might give up the excitements of politics. we know from experience of the bloodsoaked 20th century,
that the department of energy or the department of education and the number of employees they have. we do not need all that. they can cut the number of employees in half and we would have real savings. nobody will address these issues. i'll hang up. guest: when you have a budget in washington, it is hard to cut back politically. if you do, people say you are against the were the goal. this worthy goal, that worthy goal. there was a british historian in the 1950's. after world war i, britain had the largest navy in the world and they reduced the size of the navy. the laid-off sailors and dock workers. the agency running the navy was getting bigger as the navy was getting smaller. he made the discovery -- the size of a bureaucracy has nothing to do with the amount of work the bureaucracy does. it will grow unless it is reined in. the bureaucracy was getting bigger. if you get that kind of bloat, get in trouble and you change or go out of business. ronald reagan said the closest thing to immortality is a government agency. caller: good morning, everybody. do you think capitalism and privatizing is withdr
into energy, into immigration, entrepreneurship and a lot of other areas where we think policies f they change -- if they change, can promote growth. so i thank you all for coming. thank you, mr. president, and, please, pick up your book on the way out. [applause] and read it. ?rsh. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> booktv is on facebook. like us to interact with booktv guests and viewers. watch videos and get up-to-date information on events. facebook.com/booktv. >> next, chrystia freeland talks about the rides of the super rich, the top .1% of the global population. and the impact they have in the world. this talk was hosted by politics & prose bookstore in washington, d.c., and it's about an hour. [applause] >> hey, thanks a lot. and and sorry for keeping everyone waiting. you-had a chance to finish reading my book in that time. [laughter] so i probably don't need to say anything about it. so i'll just say a few things, um, about what's in my book, and then maybe we can talk about it. as i've been sort of doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers to sort of beg
, after september 11, the diversion, and the distraction of the nation's concern and energy into iraq was unpardonable. i felt what -- it was inept and corrupt and opaque. those were tough years for me. i was motivated to see barack obama, sort of a surprise, really. i could not believe we had gotten such a real person, to make it through the filter system of our politics. it meant a lot to me. i know it would have meant a huge amount to my father. i think of him often. so, again, in 2012, kim and i went on the road for obama. we did about three dozen events. it restored my faith in the country, to meet these people who had committed themselves to this reelection campaign. it was the largest grass-roots event we have ever seen in this country. the people involved were fundamentally such good people, i felt. it really meant a lot to me to be involved in an. they were smart, too. they did it really well. they were committed to this mission and they really carried it out beautifully. i should say also that although i am a relentless democrats, i do believe that a dialogue between a reaso
urban mechanics. some of you may be in the audience to today. but that energy, that talented, that brains around energizing and engineering a community's capability to lift people, that's what we've got going on in this city. that's why this room is full. >> absolutely. >> i ask the development question because i, i feel compelled to ask a news-oriented question, i don't know why. [laughter] >> paul, -- bob, can i say one thing? >> i'll get you to weigh in in a second. the biggest development on the horizon for boston is the possibility of a billion dollar casino complex being built in east boston at the suffolk downs race track if the developers win the eastern massachusetts casino license, one of the three licenses up for grabs from east to west in the state. the new state gaming commission, of course, has to go through its process, but most insiders you talk to think that the east boston plan has the best chance of any to go all the way. and i'm wondering and, ed, let me start with you here, and then i want to go to ayanna because she has to consider this on the city counc
sensible men and women if it is to prosper. it need the energy jiss of the creative imagination as expressed in the arts. it is crucial to the lives of all of our citizens as it is to all human beings at all times that they encounter a world that posseses a trance send nt meaning in which the human experience makes sense. nothing is more dehume nicing, more certain to generate a crisis than to experience one's life as a meaningless event in a meaningless world. we may be approaching what is for our nation unexplored and unperilous territory. europe is experiencing that and the results are not attractive. it seems that when a majority of people internalize the big bang theory and ask with peggy lee is that all there is, when many people decide the universe is the result of a cosmic sneeze with no meaning, when they conclude that therefore life should be filled, overflowing with distractions, comforts and entertainments to aswage the board m, then they may become suss september bling to the excitements of politics that promise ar sets meaning and spures al vations of a human condi
felt i had to be there every day to observe ronald reagan. i was still covering the energy crisis and three mile island and other things. >> on tv news, there is so much attention to what women on tv where and what they look like. is that still true? >> there was an article. >> i saw that article. >> there was a story recently about what women anchors are wearing. it was only about women. >> it seemed a little silly. i think the exciting thing is we're covering major beats, we have women in very important roles. we now have women executive producers. s runningice president group the broadcasts and making decisions. >> you do not feel that women get promoted on tv for looks? >> i am sure in some cases, yes. my experience has been in more than 34 years with nbc news and before that i was at 10 and 9, and was recruited from philadelphia to come here by them. had two very happy years there. nobody has ever said to me -- maybe once i was wearing something with polka dots. i thought i looked very chic. in my ear, i heard the producers say if you ever wear that again, i will murder you o
across dallas, texas into she haveport and all this energy sliding northeast. a lot of moisture coming up from the gulf that's just enhancing it. what does that mean for today? we don't have a tornado watch yet, but i anticipate we'll see one for this afternoon, especially for the areas highlighted in the brighter orange color. good risk for a moderate risk for the risk of tornadoes, hail and possible damaging winds. some of these winds could get up to 50 miles per hour or greater. if it's not enough where we have the lightning and thunder and rain we also have dense fog. make it any more dangerous to see if there e's debris blown apart. this is really tough this morning for those that are traveling. be very careful with the fog out there and snow building in later today and tonight. a real mess for this christmas. i hope everyone can stay inside as much as possible. >> lots for you to watch. you are a very busy girl on this christmas morning. all right, bonnie, thank you. >> and on this christmas morning, a community mourning another senseless shooting tragedy. this time in upstate new y
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)